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Xinomavro

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  1. Kir-Yianni Kali Riza Amyndeon PDO Xinamavro 2017
    Kir-Yianni Kali Riza Amyndeon PDO Xinamavro 2017
    PDO Amyndeon, 100% Xinomavro

    The 2017 Kali Riza Xinomavro "Vielles Vignes" is a Xinomavaro aged for 12 months in used, mostly (90%) French oak. It comes in at 13.5% alcohol. Sourced from old vines (50+ years) in the Rasto sub-appellation of Amyndeon, this is rather soft and sweet for the grape on opening (although the sweetness is a touch of wood that dissipates), with good acidity. The soft impression does not last long, as it has some serious tannins. As powerful as this is, it shows less rusticity than some I've seen this issue. The balance just seems to work better. The mid-palate makes this seem delicate—or you could say it has finesse. The juicy finish propelled by the acidity makes it both lively and appealing. It needs a few years in the cellar to come around, perhaps more than indicated. It should age well thereafter, perhaps also more than indicated, but let's be a bit conservative, as always. This should reward you if you cellar it a few years. MARK SQUIRES, eRobertParker.com
    2017
    Xinomavro
    Greece
  2. Argatia Naoussa 2013
    Argatia Naoussa 2013

    The 2013 Naoussa is all Xinomavro, of course, aged for 12 months in an equal mixture of French and American oak (overall, only 10% new). It comes in at 13.1% alcohol. This is a bit delicate in the mid-palate relative to its power. That's the last understatement you'll see. Showing pure power and earthy astringency, this tannic wine ends with some pop and grip. It's also got that Xinomavro acidity. Do you like them old-school, rustic, difficult and needing some age? Do you like those old-fashioned Barolos? Well, then, this is for you. Nowhere close to being ready to drink, this might—might!—be in good or at least better shape around 2023. I did see some light (and fruit) at the end of the tunnel after holding it open for two more hours and decanting it. Despite the average mid-palate depth, I think this will hold well enough to absorb some of the power and come into better balance. Right now, it seems to me to be the best wine I've seen from Argatia. It does, admittedly, have some balance questions to answer, so let's be a little conservative for the moment and let it develop. You need a cellar and patience if you buy this. Sourced from 13-year-old vines, there were only 7,000 bottles produced. MARK SQUIRES, erobertparker.com

    2013
    Xinomavro
    Greece
    454
  3. Elinos Taralas Xinomavro 2013
    Elinos Taralas Xinomavro 2013
    The 2013 Mavro, all Xinomavro from Naoussa, was aged for 14 months in used French oak and comes in at 14.8% alcohol. This fanciful label is just made for the American market, I'm told. I guess Americans have trouble saying "Xinomavro." Unfortunately, other grapes in Greece and elsewhere have "Mavro" in the name, which creates some potential confusion. Frankly, it's a bad idea, as it detracts from the increasing fame of Xinomavro as well as making a buyer question what it is. Apart from the naming convention, this is far more powerful than its older sibling this issue, the 2010. This 2013 is tight and a little forbidding right now, not that close to ready. In other respects, it is lot like the 2010, with a nose and palate that seem to have a rather high-toned demeanor. In structure and concentration, this is quite fine. Let's be conservative for the moment and see where the rest of this goes in a few years. At the price point, it is not a great risk. MARK SQUIRES, eRobertParker.com
    2013
    Xinomavro
    Greece
    445
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